EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health

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The premier online source for science news since 1996. A service of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Updated: 8 weeks 5 days ago

New technique could help engineer polluted water filter, human tissues

Tue, 2019-07-23 21:00
(Rutgers University) Scientists can turn proteins into never-ending patterns that look like flowers, trees or snowflakes, a technique that could help engineer a filter for tainted water and human tissues. Their study, led by researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, appears in the journal Nature Chemistry.
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Active pharmaceutical ingredients can persist in the environment

Tue, 2019-07-23 21:00
(American Society of Agronomy) A study finds trace levels of medicines in drinking water from private wells.
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An apple carries about 100 million bacteria -- good luck washing them off

Tue, 2019-07-23 21:00
(Frontiers) Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, a new study shows that organic apples harbor a more diverse and balanced bacterial community -- which could make them healthier and tastier than conventional apples, as well as better for the environment.
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Study finds meal timing strategies appear to lower appetite, improve fat burning

Tue, 2019-07-23 21:00
(The Obesity Society ) Researchers have discovered that meal timing strategies such as intermittent fasting or eating earlier in the daytime appear to help people lose weight by lowering appetite rather than burning more calories, according to a report published online today in the journal Obesity, the flagship journal of The Obesity Society. The study is the first to show how meal timing affects 24-hour energy metabolism when food intake and meal frequency are matched.
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Former NFL players may face higher risk of atrial fibrillation

Tue, 2019-07-23 21:00
(American Heart Association) Former National Football League (NFL) players were nearly 6 times more likely to have atrial fibrillation (AF), a type of irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke.Former NFL athletes had lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, and had lower resting heart rates compared to the control group, yet the incidence of atrial fibrillation was still higher.
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PrEP use high but wanes after three months among young African women

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) In a study of open-label Truvada as daily pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV among young African women and adolescent girls, 95% initiated PrEP, and most used PrEP for the first three months. However, PrEP use fell in this critical population during a year of follow-up clinic visits, although HIV incidence at 12 months was low. The preliminary results suggest that tailored strategies may be needed to engage young African women in consistent PrEP use.
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E. coli superbug strains can persist in healthy women's guts

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A study of over 1,000 healthy women with no urinary tract infection symptoms showed nearly 9% carried multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli strains in their guts. Additional findings highlight likely reasons behind the pandemic of resistant E. coli strains. They show the value of checking a patients' carrier-status to predict resistant infections, and the need to re-think the clinical significance of bacteria in the urine without symptoms, because pandemic strains can be highly pathogenic to the urinary system and treatment resistant.
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George Mason University breast cancer treatment patent licensed by Targeted Pharmaceuticals

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(George Mason University) A patent granted to George Mason University Research Foundation Inc., via Drs. Virginia Espina and Lance Liotta of George Mason University, and Dr. Kirsten Edmiston of Inova Health System which describes a novel treatment method for pre-invasive breast cancer, has been exclusively licensed to Targeted Pharmaceuticals LLC, a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on utilizing cannabinoids for the treatment of oncology and central nervous system disorders.
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Brain protein mutation from child with autism causes autism-like behavioral change in mice

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) A de novo gene mutation that encodes a brain protein in a child with autism has been placed into the brains of mice. These mice then showed severe alterations of specific behaviors that closely resemble those seen in human autism spectrum disorder, or ASD.
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Hit your head, lose your sense of smell

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(University of Montreal) People who suffer even a mild concussion can find it difficult to identify smells in the day that follows, and have anxiety problems a year later, a Canadian study finds.
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Researchers map protein-gene interactions involved in Alzheimer's disease

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(University of California - San Diego) UC San Diego researchers have used the transcriptome -- the sum of all messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules expressed from genes -- to map protein-gene interactions involved in Alzheimer's disease.
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Study identifies cells required for the development of a healthy uterus

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital has uncovered insights on a type of a critical cell that to the formation of a functioning uterus.
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Study: Fat cells play key role in dangerous transformation of melanoma

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) Tel Aviv University reseachers have found that fat cells play a key role in the dangerous transformation of melanoma.
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Zhang group identifies gene that may make TNBC cells vulnerable to existing

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(University of Notre Dame) A new study by University of Notre Dame researcher Siyuan Zhang and collaborators, published in Nature Communications, shows that an existing, FDA-approved drug that treats other types of breast cancer may work for TNBC.
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Folic acid reduces risk of neural tube defects linked to HIV drug dolutegravir

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(Baylor College of Medicine) HIV drug doluteglavir interferes with the binding of folate to its receptor, thus promoting neural tube defects. Folic acid supplementation can mitigate the risk of the medication in an animal model.
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University of Guelph researchers unlock access to pain relief potential of cannabis

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(University of Guelph) University of Guelph researchers have uncovered how the cannabis plant creates pain-relieving molecules that are 30 times more powerful at reducing inflammation than Aspirin.The discovery unlocks the potential to create a naturally derived pain treatment.
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Most women use vaginal ring for HIV prevention in open-label study

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) In an open-label study of women in southern and eastern Africa, a vaginal ring that is inserted once a month and slowly releases an antiviral drug was estimated to reduce the risk of HIV by 39%, according to statistical modeling. In addition, the study found that participants appeared to use the ring more in the open-label study than in a previous clinical trial.
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MicroRNAs from human fat cells can impair macrophage ability to eliminate cholesterol

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(Children's National Health System) A multi-institutional team led by research faculty at Children's National in Washington, DC, finds that extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from kids' fat can play a pivotal role in ratcheting up risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease well before any worrisome symptoms become visible.
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Microfluidics device helps diagnose sepsis in minutes

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A novel sensor designed by MIT researchers could dramatically accelerate the process of diagnosing sepsis, a leading cause of death in US hospitals that kills nearly 250,000 patients annually.
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Survey finds physicians struggle with their own self-care

Mon, 2019-07-22 21:00
(The Reis Group) Despite believing that self-care is a vitally important part of health and overall well-being, many physicians overlook their own self-care, according to a new survey released today, conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of Samueli Integrative Health Programs. Lack of time, job demands, family demands, being too tired and burnout are the most common reasons for not practicing their desired amount of self-care.
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